All tagged chemical warfare

WWI Further Reading

One of our readers requested some additional source material about some of what I write about on CBRNPro.net. The Further Reading list posted today will appear in our forthcoming book on Belleau Wood and in our series of publications of Rexmond Cochrane's work, but I'm posting it here for a "living version" on our website to encourage others to learn more about the most critical part of CBRN history - the beginning. 

Aum Shinrikyo Part 4: Conclusion and Summary

In the conclusion to our series exploring the Aum Shinrikyo attacks on the Tokyo Subway, CBRNPro.net argues that medical facilities, like St. Luke's in Tokyo, are a main locus for CBRN incident response, even more so than incident scenes in many cases. Planning, coordination, and information management are key to solving the problems associated with CBRN incidents, and have wider application to mass casualty incidents.

Re-examining the History of Chemical Warfare - Part I

Chemical warfare in the WWI is usually relegated to a side show in most history. That is a fundamental error. Chemical casualties in the last year of the war accounted for 30-40 percent of casualties in major operations. The final year of the war demonstrated the tactical efficiency of chemical weapons in both the offense and defense, a stark departure from chemical warfare between 1915 and 1917. Historians usually talk about the early attacks when chemical warfare was largely insignificant, but this leaves out the importance of the chemical war to the end of the war. 

In the first in a multi-part series re-examining chemical warfare in the First World War, with particular emphasis on the American Experience. CBRNPro.net examines long-held myths about chemical warfare in WWI, and the propaganda that pushed them into the history books. Many of the lessons that history failed to learn, still apply today.

An Alternate Approach to CBRN Operations

CBRNPro.net offers an alternate approach to CBRN operations that differs from the traditional HazMat Operations based approach discussed last week. By focusing on the target, CBRN operators can obtain greater clarity and focus in their mission planning, equipment selection, and training. Oh, and we talk about the obvious. You know, stuff like big giant titanium balls from outer space, like the one in the picture.